Archive for the ‘Aphasia Recovery’ Category

Aphasia Camp Northwest 2016

June 17, 2016

Aphasia Camp Northwest 2016 registration is open. I’ve never been there, but it looks like a lot of fun. From Aphasia Network below, find more information by clicking on the link.

“The Aphasia Network has opened registration for Aphasia Camp Northwest 2016 at Camp Magruder in Rockaway Beach, OR.

  •  Weekend Camp is Saturday, August 27th at 10am through Monday, August 29th at 11am.
  •  This year, we are offering Day Camp on both Saturday and Sunday, 10am up to 9pm.

Information, as well as an application and a list of frequently asked questions can be found on the website http://www.AphasiaNetwork.org. Learn more, watch a video or read stories from past campers. If you have additional questions, about camp, email us at camp@aphasianetwork.org or call Gabrielle at (503) 314-5462 or Suzanne at (503) 577-1282.” (Aphasia Network)

 

Contributed by Carol Cline Schultz, author of Crossing the Void: My Aphasic Journey

Carol@CrossingTheVoid.com

Aphasia recovery: “Speaking of Technology” by Jan Caswell in the Stroke Connection Magazine

March 20, 2016

Too often, speech therapy insurance runs out before recovery has run its course. One way to get more speech therapy hours is to incorporate the use of technology devices. “Speaking of Technology” discusses the practical benefits of technology apps and mentions several apps you may be interested in investigating. Your speech therapist can help narrow down the various apps that will best help for your particular aphasia.

Contributed by Carol Cline Schultz, author of Crossing the Void: My Aphasic Journey. http://www.crossingthevoid.com

Aphasia stroke risk and clotting.

December 15, 2015

One way to reduce the chance of having a stroke is to consider the chance of clotting, and doing what you can to avoid clotting. “Am I at Risk for a Clot?” discusses the 9 hidden dangers of blood clots. For information: Am I at Risk for a Clot

 

Contributed by Carol Cline Schultz, author of Crossing the Void: My Aphasic Journey. carol@crossingthevoid.com

“Aphasia” (the movie) and the “when” word!

February 20, 2015

Carl McIntyre’s movie, “Aphasia” is a winner. One out of 250 people in the United Stated have aphasia, but very few have heard of it. Have you? Do you feel awkward when you come across a brain impaired person who cannot speak? Wonder if they are intelligent? Wonder if they understood you? Wish you understood them? Wish you could help them, but don’t know where to begin? Then watch the movie “Aphasia”.

I first watched “Aphasia” with other aphasic survivors at a University of Washington support group meeting. The star, Carl McIntyre, plays himself documenting his aphasic stroke. From the onset, the audience is brought into the predicaments he faced – from pathos to triumph, tears to laughter. Each of us had been there; each empathetic to his plight.

When Carl’s is not comfortable listening to the babbling din in a large group, we remember. The undecipherable word sounds in his empty language center had been the same for us.

When Carl is hurtfully ridiculed because of his brain impairment, we feel his pain. Even unintentional slights were insults.

When Carl has difficulty operating a phone, we remember how difficult it had been for us.

When credit agencies call about past due payments, we share his anxiety. How will his family manage without his income?

When Carl drives through a drive-by to order a Frosty only to remember he is not able to speak, we chuckle.  On similar occasion we’d forgotten our speechlessness and had been rudely reminded of our limits.

When the word “when” shows its face on a flash card presented to Carl by his speech therapist, we hold our breath and I grimace. At this point, I pause . . . until the next post when I will expound on the troublesome “when” word.

In the meantime, check out Carl McIntyre. Find a copy of “Aphasia”. Watch it. Share it with your family, groups and medical personnel who come into contact with aphasic people.  Spread the word.

 

Contributed by Carol Cline Schultz, author of Crossing the Void: My Aphasic Journey. Carol@CrossingtheVoid.com

Caregivers and Stroke Recovery

February 4, 2015

When aphasia and paralysis struck Mark McEwen from a stroke, his wife Denise became his caregiver. Her advice to others is that it’s best to ignore naysayers. Be inspired by reading the article “Wife of popular television personality shares what she’s learned as a caregiver”. It was presented in the American Heart Association “Your Winter 2015 Issue”.

Connect to the American Heart Association by going to www.strokeassociation.org/strokeconnection  1-888-478-76563

Shared by Carol Cline Schultz, author of “Crossing the Void: My Aphasic Journey”. Carol@CrossingtheVoid.com

Aphasia Recovery Connection

January 10, 2015

Aphasia recovery requires networking among survivors and caregivers. I was impressed with Aphasia Recovery Connection, an on-line support group organization. It is written by two young aphasic people with help from their supporters. The written format is simple for those who’s aphasia leaves them with reading impairment. Video presentations address the need to communicate with those who cannot read at all. Extras also include announcements of aphasia conferences and cruises. Caregivers and survivors, check out their site and see if you agree with me.

People with Aphasia for People with Aphasia from Connect

August 14, 2014

Aphasia survivors helping each other are instrumental in recovery, as is evident in this report  from Connect (www.ukconnect.org), the communication disability network based in the UK:

“Aphasia can affect the ability to read, write, speak or use numbers. It affects each person differently. It can affect anyone at any time and at any age. When aphasia strikes it changes people’s lives in an instant. Aphasia can lead to isolation, the breakdown of relationships and at times depression.  At Connect we make sure that people with aphasia are at the centre of everything we do. They act as trustees, trainers, advisors, staff members, volunteers, interviewers, service deliverers, co-facilitators, activist and hub members. Connect has a very strong peer-led philosophy. We work in equal partnership with people with aphasia, to develop and offer services that are run by people with aphasia for people with aphasia. An example of our peer-led philosophy in practice is our weekly drop-ins at our London centre, our befriending schemes and our special interests groups.

Below Carol tells her story. Carol Griffiths had a stroke in 2007 when she was 42. She was leading a busy life as a MENCAP carer, teaching assistant and foster mother.”

“One day out of the blue I had a stroke and in an instant and my ability to talk was wiped out. I felt so isolated and confused because I could not communicate with people. I felt depressed and very anxious about how“Aphasia can affect the ability to read, write, speak or use numbers. It affects each person differently. It can affect anyone at any time and at any age. When aphasia strikes it changes people’s lives in an instant. Aphasia can lead to isolation, the breakdown of relationships and at times depression.  At Connect we make sure that people with aphasia are at the centre of everything we do. They act as trustees, trainers, advisors, staff members, volunteers, interviewers, service deliverers, co-facilitators, activist and hub members. Connect has a very strong peer-led philosophy. We work in equal partnership with people with aphasia, to develop and offer services that are run by people with aphasia for people with aphasia. An example of our peer-led philosophy in practice is our weekly drop-ins at our London centre, our befriending schemes and our special interests groups. I could parent my children properly. I lost most of my old friends, as people lost patience with me. I felt trapped, with my confidence destroyed. I couldn’t carry on with my old life.

Connect helped me to come to terms with what had happened to me. They helped me understand that I didn’t have to go through this process alone. Step by step with diligence and patience they taught me how to communicate and recover my life back. Meeting other people who know what aphasia is like is the key to feeling like I can be myself again. It also is the key to unlocking my potential in helping others and being independent. That’s what Connect and the Connect Cornwall project is all about. With new hope and confidence I wanted a new purpose in life and to ensure that people didn’t become isolated like I did. That’s why I trained to be a Connect befriender.

 

The first person I visited was Kay. She lived by herself after having aphasia for four years and had little therapy or support. I have helped encourage her to communicate again and in our own way, we chatted about lots of things. I got huge satisfaction from seeing Kay blossom and was delighted when she felt confident enough to train to be a befriender like me.

Since befriending, I’ve gone from strength to strength. I have recently qualified as a teacher and am due to start work soon. Imagine that! I now love standing up and talking to people. When I first came to Connect I couldn’t say ‘Boo’ to a goose.”

 

As reported from Connect.

Shared by Carol Cline Schultz, author. “Crossing the Void: My Aphasic Journey”, Carol@CrossingtheVoid.com

What is Aphasia?

July 5, 2014

Help an aphasic person by helping others feel more comfortable while interacting with them. The American Stroke Association, issued two posters about aphasia and how to communicate through speechless barriers.  Download and share these handouts with family members, caregivers, advocates and medical support personnel.

Contributed from the Stroke Connection Summer 2014 online magazine.

Learn more at Stroke Association.org/aphasia and Aphasia.org

Carol Cline Schultz, Author

Crossing the Void: My Aphasic Journey

www.CrossingTheVoid.com

 

A Blue Ribbon Winner

November 6, 2013

“Crossing the Void: My Aphasic Journey” is a 2013 blue ribbon winner, having been awarded first place category winner of the Chanticleer Book Reviews Journey Awards for Narrative Non-fiction Enlightenment.

http://chantireviews.com/2013/05/30/journey-awards-first-place-category-winners-for-narrative-non-fiction/

I am humbled; it is an honor to be available to help those with aphasia.

Carol Cline Schultz, Author

Crossing the Void: My Aphasic Journey

www.CrossingTheVoid.com

Author at the Chanticleer Book Reviews awards event at Nicks Bella Maria Restaurant, Bellingham, Washington.

Author at the Chanticleer Book Reviews awards event at Nicks Bella Marina Restaurant, Bellingham, Washington.